Create your own mission statement


A mission statement can help a company and also an individual to stay on track with what they are planning to do when they have many options to choose from. It tells you which of your qualities and/or values are helping you to achieve your goals (in case you want to further develop any of them). And it tells you how you want to make an impact in actions and also in desired outcomes.

A mission statement is a formal summary of the aims and values of a company, organization, or individual.

(Oxford Languages)

Creating a mission statement is not simple for most people. And in practice you can expect to read and re-read your efforts quite a few times while improving on it often until you finally feel that it is a good reflection of what you are trying to accomplish and achieve and how you plan to do it.

The download resource below takes you through a series of questions which you answer from your own perspective.

Here is an example:

Download template file:

Steps

  1. Answering the questions is easier than crafting the final statement. Do take your time answering the questions and feel free to keep editing it until you feel there is nothing more you can add to it. The more answers you have, the easier it might be for you to highlight the final aspects which you want to include in your own mission statement.
  2. Use your answers to fill in the blanks in the draft mission statement area.
  3. Put your draft mission statement up on the wall maybe where you bush your hair or your teeth so you can read it often. Be sure to keep a pen or pencil handy so you can easily add comments to it as you read it on a regular basis and consider how satisfied you feel about it as a mission statement.
Completing the Mission Statement

Editing would include using better words to describe something or shortening a phrase with just one word that better brings the message across in a more succinct manner.

When you no longer feel further editing is required, your mission statement is complete. For some people they reach the end of editing when they feel in their gut that the statement inspires them and just “feels right”. Others reach the point of just mentally feeling it fully includes all the key aspects that are important to them as individuals. Only you would know when you have reached the point of having completed the exercise.

Keep your mission statement somewhere on your phone or in your diary where you can easily refer to it in times of feeling overwhelmed by options and opportunities. Use your mission statement to help you choose what to focus on when you feel distracted or need to choose which volunteer role you want to take on next.

Have fun with it. It is a great process to help you get clarity on what matters enough to you to strive towards achieving and contributing to this world.

Don’t hit send (yet)


Maybe the truth is that nobody is helping new employees focus their efforts in order to produce better reports or emails. And by better, I mean some of the items that are in this checklist (below). Perhaps, instead, it is the excitement and eagerness to hit the send button too soon.

Let’s walk through 5 things you can do to ensure that your email or your report or slide deck does not suffer from a few preventable ailments and risk being deemed as “not ready yet” for further distribution. Delivering work that is incomplete or incorrect will not lead to being considered for more responsibilities any time soon. Want to move up? Focus on the quality of your work first.

All names spelled correctly

Most people find it annoying to read minutes of meetings or a report which names them but misspells their first or last names. This is completely avoidable these days. With the internet and most people having Linkedin accounts, or in the same company you can look people up on the email system. There is no reason why we should be misspelling people’s names these days. When you do not take the time to double-check, it comes across as callous, lazy, or just not committed to producing quality work.

All dates are correct

Not all countries use the same format for dates. This would be the first point to consider – who will read your email/report? Check (online if needed): how do they write dates in that country? If you have a distribution list including people from multiple countries, consider writing the date out more: 3 Mar 2019 (for example)

The second point is more often a bugbear of mine – dates in the same document contradicting one another. For example: on page 2 of the slide deck it states that the project is completed on 2 Dec of that year, on page 5 it states that the project will run well into the new year and completion is projected to be the end of March of the next year. Which one is correct? If they are both correct – explain the term completion used on slides 2 and 5. Always check the latest version of your reference material or project schedule before you finalize your section on dates. It reflects badly on the creator of a document or slide deck where dates are misaligned and confusing. Check first!

Spelling or grammar errors

It is very avoidable these days to produce and send documents or slides to others without spelling errors. Use the built-in spell-check in Microsoft suite or a similar feature in other packages used. Some packages will also pick up grammar errors and flag it for you – if you have that feature turned on! Sometimes a missing word is not picked up by built-in checks. Read your own text back to yourself – aloud. Say each word. And make sure the words are not correctly spelled but actually the wrong word for the context. Examples would include: they’re/their/there or hear/here/hair

Use sane fonts

Some companies have branded templates to use for creating reports or slides. If your company does not have rules around branding which include the font colors, types, and sizes to use in company documents and slides, I would go with common sense. This would include – not using all the colors of the rainbow and multiple types of font in a project progress report and not varying the size of the font in every bullet-point you use. [Of course, if you are in the creative world and these variations are a design part of your project (as would be normal in advertising or other creative endeavors) this message is not for you].

Make it easier

Is there a clear structure to your work? Think about the message you want to communicate. What are the main points, what are the next level of detailed points to support each of the main points? Structuring your reports or emails greatly enhances the readers’ abilities to quickly understand what it is about, what the options are, and what you are proposing.

Use headings for distinct paragraphs and consider a bulleted list to align points that are grouped together under a heading. If the sequence or number of points are relevant, why not use a numbered list instead?

Speed in sending out reports is often not the biggest priority. Sending out something fast while the items listed above are incorrect or incoherent can truly harm your reputation. You would not come across as someone who has self-discipline, pride in the quality of your work, or who is seen as thorough – someone your boss can trust to give more responsibilities to! Pause, check, then hit send!